Not all divorces have to be traumatic

Not all divorces have to be traumatic

| Sep 22, 2020 | Divorce |

When most people think about divorce, we think of a traumatic event that follows after another traumatic event, like a domestic violence incident or a spouse caught cheating. But, this is not necessarily a common occurrence, despite what reality television may show us. Instead, often, couples just grow apart. They become different people, or they just grow to a point where they want different things from life. This is the case for the divorce between rappers, Cardi B and Offset.

Why are they divorcing?

Cardi B, most recently famous for her “WAP” single, explained on Instagram Live on Sept. 18 that their divorce was not because of a cheating scandal or any other salacious incident. Rather, the two just grew apart and could not find consensus. In other words, they no longer saw eye-to-eye on what they wanted from life.

This is why she filed for divorce on Sept. 15 in the Fulton County Magistrate Court, instead of waiting for her relationship to devolve into something that neither party wants. Her first divorce hearing is currently set for Nov. 4.

Drifting apart can mean a more amicable divorce through mediation

When married Maryland couples reach that point where it is time for their lives to diverge, divorce is often the best option for both, which makes mediation a tempting resolution strategy. Divorce mediation sets the stage for each party to work with a third-party, neutral mediator, usually a divorce attorney themselves. They then negotiate what they want their post-divorce lives to look like, and both parties can still utilize a divorce attorney individually. This makes the process much less costly than a protracted divorce litigation battle, and it allows the couples to control their decoupling, not a random judge.

The first step

When someone in the Washington, D.C. metro area is thinking about divorce, the first step is to consult with a divorce attorney. A divorce attorney can help walk through the process with a prospective filer, and maybe even help facilitate a discussion with the other spouse to see how both parties would like to proceed.

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